Can You Do What You Love?
Finding Power, Purpose, and Happiness when the Old Rules Don't Apply

On Friday, May 16th, Andy Crouch and leading thinkers got together to discuss doing what you love, being part of something meaningful, and still getting paid in a messy and unpredictable world.

 


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About the Panel

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Andy Crouch

Journalist and Culture Maker

Andy Crouch is a multi-careered, culturally concerned, award-winning author, editor, musician, husband, and father. Currently serving as executive editor of Christianity Today, he is also involved with International Justice Mission and has written two books pursuing contemporary issues surrounding Christians, culture, church, and power. With insight and humour, he works to make the complex clear and to create delicious chili most Wednesday nights—at least until his kids outdo his culinary skills.

ANDY-Crouch.com
twitter: @ahc

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Rikk Watts

Professor

Rikk Watts is Professor of New Testament at Regent College. A dynamic Aussie with a background in engineering and drumming, Rikk loves connecting theology with all of life and helping students understand God’s story and their place within it. He comes to school with a cup of coffee in hand and is continually amazed at the goodness of creation amidst the day-to-day.

www.regent-college.edu
email: rwatts@regent-college.edu

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Josh Kwan

Social Catalyst

With a background in journalism, social entrepreneurship, and philanthropy, Josh Kwan works with young nonprofits to tackle global poverty. He's the Co-Founder and Board Chair of Praxis, as well as Director of International Giving at the David Weekley Family Foundation.

praxislabs.org
twitter: @JoshKwan

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PAIGE GUTACKER

Moderator

Paige Gutacker is a Regent College student who loves to make things—food, décor, pottery, sentences, songs, and laughter. She is working toward a Master of Arts in Theological Studies, serves as the Alumni Network Catalyst for Summit Ministries, and does mentor training with Christian educators through The Cultivate Project.

cultivateproject.com
email: paige@summit.org

  • The Reality of Work, for Better or for Worse
    by R. Paul Stevens

    Work is part of our God-imaging dignity as human beings. We are made, as Genesis tells us, to be an icon or reflection of the divine being. We find in the seminal passage of the first book of the Bible that being a God-reflecting person involves two things. First, we are made as relational beings, “male and female in his image” (Gn 1:27). … But the second iconic dimension is equally important: God is a worker, and God made us to work like himself. 

    Read More
  • The Evangelical Work Ethic
    by Greg Forster

    Our culture's hunger for meaning and dignity in everyday work is a window through which Christians can shine the light of the gospel. No civilization can grow and flourish when its people spend the vast majority of their waking hours in an activity they find meaningless. The deepest root of our economic crisis is that people no longer find a worthy purpose in the daily practice of diligence, honesty, self-control, generosity, and service. This creates a timely moment for people to rediscover how God brings dignity and meaning to daily life.

    Read More
  • Starting from the Roots: An Interview with Paul Williams and Ceri Rees
    by Julia Cheung

    Paul: I don’t instinctively have warm fuzzy feelings towards the idea of “Do What You Love” on a number of levels. I do think that God has made us so that we can enjoy working. When what he gives us to do resonates with who we are, with something that comes alive in us, then that life is good. But we live in a fallen world. Those good things only occur in God’s economy when our gaze is outwards, towards God and other people. That is when “who I am” and “what I do” starts to sing. It’s not when I’m focusing on satisfying myself.

    Read More
  • Power to the People
    by Tom Nelson

    Confession is good for the soul, but it's hard for pastors. At least it was for me. Years ago I stood before my congregation to make a heartfelt confession. It was indeed difficult to do, yet it would prove transformative for our entire faith community. More than a decade has passed since that day, but I still remember it clearly. Against a backdrop of pindrop silence, I asked the congregation I served to forgive me. Not for sexual impropriety or financial misconduct, but for pastoral malpractice. I confessed I had spent the minority of my time equipping them for what they were called to do for the majority of their week.

    Read More
  • Finding Grace in Unlikely Places
    by Meera Bai

    I found my vocation by searching out God in strange places, then showing others how to do the same. I currently work in my hometown of Calgary. Part of my time is spent working on the ground with patients who are struggling with addiction. The other part of my time, I spend as an instructor with the University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing, teaching students about mental health and addiction. The truth is, there are any number of positions in my field that I could happily do. What I learned at Regent is that it isn’t the structure—it’s the heart that matters. God’s work among the addicted has stolen my heart, and his love for them continues to amaze me.

    Read More
  • Redeeming Work Events
    from Leadership Journal

    Join over 150 church leaders for a one-day event to renew and fulfill our calling to the called. For the sake of your community and God's world, believers must connect Christ's call to every hour of their week and every area of their lives. What does the gospel have to say about where our people spend most of their time? Redeeming Work—a series of six events explores the latest research and biblical scholarship on faith and work, and how to recapture a theology of vocation in today's church.

    Read More
Additional work and faith-related resources from The Regent World and Christianity Today
  • The Reality of Work, for Better or for Worse
    by R. Paul Stevens

    Work is part of our God-imaging dignity as human beings. We are made, as Genesis tells us, to be an icon or reflection of the divine being. We find in the seminal passage of the first book of the Bible that being a God-reflecting person involves two things. First, we are made as relational beings, “male and female in his image” (Gn 1:27). … But the second iconic dimension is equally important: God is a worker, and God made us to work like himself. 

    Read More
  • The Evangelical Work Ethic
    by Greg Forster

    Our culture's hunger for meaning and dignity in everyday work is a window through which Christians can shine the light of the gospel. No civilization can grow and flourish when its people spend the vast majority of their waking hours in an activity they find meaningless. The deepest root of our economic crisis is that people no longer find a worthy purpose in the daily practice of diligence, honesty, self-control, generosity, and service. This creates a timely moment for people to rediscover how God brings dignity and meaning to daily life.

    Read More
  • Starting from the Roots: An Interview with Paul Williams and Ceri Rees
    by Julia Cheung

    Paul: I don’t instinctively have warm fuzzy feelings towards the idea of “Do What You Love” on a number of levels. I do think that God has made us so that we can enjoy working. When what he gives us to do resonates with who we are, with something that comes alive in us, then that life is good. But we live in a fallen world. Those good things only occur in God’s economy when our gaze is outwards, towards God and other people. That is when “who I am” and “what I do” starts to sing. It’s not when I’m focusing on satisfying myself.

    Read More
  • Power to the People
    by Tom Nelson

    Confession is good for the soul, but it's hard for pastors. At least it was for me. Years ago I stood before my congregation to make a heartfelt confession. It was indeed difficult to do, yet it would prove transformative for our entire faith community. More than a decade has passed since that day, but I still remember it clearly. Against a backdrop of pindrop silence, I asked the congregation I served to forgive me. Not for sexual impropriety or financial misconduct, but for pastoral malpractice. I confessed I had spent the minority of my time equipping them for what they were called to do for the majority of their week.

    Read More
  • Finding Grace in Unlikely Places
    by Meera Bai

    I found my vocation by searching out God in strange places, then showing others how to do the same. I currently work in my hometown of Calgary. Part of my time is spent working on the ground with patients who are struggling with addiction. The other part of my time, I spend as an instructor with the University of Calgary Faculty of Nursing, teaching students about mental health and addiction. The truth is, there are any number of positions in my field that I could happily do. What I learned at Regent is that it isn’t the structure—it’s the heart that matters. God’s work among the addicted has stolen my heart, and his love for them continues to amaze me.

    Read More
  • Redeeming Work Events
    from Leadership Journal

    Join over 150 church leaders for a one-day event to renew and fulfill our calling to the called. For the sake of your community and God's world, believers must connect Christ's call to every hour of their week and every area of their lives. What does the gospel have to say about where our people spend most of their time? Redeeming Work—a series of six events explores the latest research and biblical scholarship on faith and work, and how to recapture a theology of vocation in today's church.

    Read More

Additional work and faith-related resources from The Regent World and Christianity Today